Has Britain fallen out of love with Tesco?

Graham Soult

Retail consultant, writer, blogger; helping retailers via CannyInsights.com and CannySites.com. Say hello on Twitter at @soult!

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4 Responses

  1. John says:

    Also another thing to add to this. Tesco don’t seem to have caught on that many shoppers are “smart shopping” these days, especially people like me who need certain brands and will look online first on sites such as mysupermarket.com and see where that product is cheapest and tailor the grocery shopping trip around it. If I need catfood and my cats’ fave brands is on offer in Sainsburys then I’ll have a walk down there.

    Since the advent of the recession my shopping basket will be 75% offers and 25% core products. Being in an area with two major supermarkets in close proximity of each other (Asda and Sainsburys), I can easily pick up most of my shopping on loss leading offers because I have the flexibility to be able to walk to either store quite easily. Tesco tend to be out of town these days and their local stores are a heck of a lot dearer than their counterparts Asda. There are occasionally too good to miss offers on at Tesco but because it’s so big, such an effort to visit and a fivers petrol there and back you don’t really make any savings in the long term and Asda’s day to day grocery range at good prices coupled with their 3 for £10 wine offers are always better value than anything Tesco can offer.

    As a household that purchases about 8-10 bottles of wine a week, I would rather spend £30 in Asda than £45 in Tesco for the same product. It’s massive difference

  2. John says:

    Being in the North East too, I hate the Kingston Park Newcastle Branch with a vengance. I only go there when it’s absolutely necessary which is approximately 4 times a year

  3. Definitely true that Tesco’s become soulless; I remember those Prunella Scales adverts very fondly!

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